Saturday, February 25, 2012

BOOK REVIEW: Outclass Teams: Secrets of Building High-Performance, Result-Oriented Teams / Author: Qaiser Abbas

Thanks to Possibilities Publications for the review copy

Published by Daily Times / Saturday, February 25, 2012

Reviewed by Afrah Jamal

Runaway Teams beware. Qaiser Abbas is an organisational psychologist, author of books like the Tik Tok Dollar and the upcoming Leadership Insights — and one canny facilitator who introduced Pakistan to the concept of ‘Management by Adventure’, or as he likes to call it, MBA. His mission of rescuing wayward teams from doom makes him dash in and out of companies on a regular basis. Prompted by the success of such expeditions, he proceeds to refine these insights for a book on team-building and a lecture on group dynamics.

As someone who specialised in using experiential learning methodology in outdoor training, Abbas swears by well-structured one-day team-building programmes over time spent bonding over social activities. His recent book takes an in-depth look at this phenomenon to determine the value of team-building, show the expertise needed to ensure its success and, once achieved, evaluate its impact on overall performance. The path to redemption is lined with wisdom (conventional/unconventional) marketed with considerable flair. Every so often an enthusiastic yell of ‘Are you Ready’ (in all caps) cuts across the wilderness — and then the readers are off for a crash course in building great teams.

“Teams are fluid, they do not remain the same, team work is not automatic, team spirit is not constant and team bond is not immortal,” he announces, admitting that he often goes “off-track to meet the needs of different teams and clients”. While team-building is not the ultimate ‘fixit’, Abbas will insist that “a sound, well-coordinated and totally customised team-building experience” is a good place to start.

Written in a dry textbook format, he customises his pitch to appeal to prospective clients just as much as facilitators in training or troubled teams looking for a saviour. By tying real life examples around tried and tested concepts, a change of scenery is suggested to stage such interventions. In his opinion, “team-building is the beginning and not the end” and helping teams in dire straits requires being cognizant with stress fractures and a willingness to embrace what might be perceived as radical concepts in closed societies.

The author must not have come across much resistance and happily shares the seven key secrets of an outclass team before guiding readers though his customised team-building programmes where teams discover, compete, transform, partner, build and revitalise. He then rifles through their psyche and since each team differs, the resultant methodology will differ accordingly. Along the way he will make surprising pronouncements — like how conflicts can actually be good and argue that well-defined challenges can help motivate lacklustre teams.

This handbook further clarifies the role of the facilitator, the dos and don’ts of high performing teams, laying down some fixed tenets that must be obeyed for the process to take hold. It goes on to expand on the role of a team facilitator outlining a list of team-building exercises in the six stage process designed to help organisations alter their trajectory. Before trainers rush out to try out these recipes, they are forestalled with an analysis of why some team-building programmes fail where others succeed with personal anecdotes thrown in to enliven these discussions. Some of the indicators might include aloof managers, a shortsighted approach instead of a long term strategy, or failure to defer to an outsider “with no agenda and more credibility”.

These exercises could be extensions of party games but here they are used to rekindle the dormant spark and fortify team spirit. Cultural constraints that might hinder his well-meaning efforts remain unexplored. While the information presented within provides a framework for creating a solid base; it also stops to strategise to make these changes stick by listing seven keys that keep the revitalisation process in constant motion.

This ambitious study attempts to place the prevalent corporate culture in context while outlining the moving parts of a successful team-building programme. It demonstrates how such a tiered approach can help companies circumnavigate corporate landmines and reconfigure a broken team. For the author, all this is part of a process “that brings people to a point where they can appreciate each other’s essence and ultimately this appreciation becomes the driver for collaboration”.

Judging from the eager testimonials listed on the cover, his visionary approach has inspired countless already. There was one who initially worried that “sharing trade secrets was tantamount to professional hara-kiri” (he later comes around) — others might take this book of revelations as a smartly worded proposal generously seasoned with elegantly designed solutions to sweeten a bland presentation. In either case, after floating such enticing images of “results oriented, high performance teams” an inexplicable urge to get an ‘MBA’ would be understandable.

Possibilities Publications;
Pp 204; Rs 1,450

Saturday, February 11, 2012

BOOK REVIEW: Hira Mandi / Author: Claudine Le Tourneur Dlson

Published in Daily Times Saturday, February 11, 2012

Reproduced on Claudine Le Tourneur Dlson's Website

Translated from French by Priyanka Jhijaria

Reviewed by Afrah Jamal

A programme about Hira Mandi did the internet rounds a couple of years ago. It claimed, among other things, that the sons of the ‘dancers’ reportedly end up as lawyers, doctors, artists — a few join politics and some even reach the military. These outrageous statistics may be one of the reasons the documentary was banned from the mainstream media. That and its primary premise — the plight of the fallen women — would prompt the conservatives to howl with dismay before scurrying off to bury any evidence in the backyard along with other bodies.


Claudine Le Tourneur d’Ison embeds such wrenching moments in a bold narrative where its doomed protagonist can hail the brave new world and its genteel patrons from an extraordinary vantage point. The expedition to the underworld with the unfortunate progeny and the hapless dwellers of ‘Hira Mandi’ (red-light district) that lasts six decades is both harrowing and unexpected. The wreckage of lost dreams decaying in the old walled city arrives on cue; happy endings leave by the same door in this new book generously seasoned with half a century’s worth of infamy.

Staged in the most infamous parts of Lahore, Hira Mandi turns this sensational premise with its overarching theme of misery into a lavish set piece where a young Shanwaz Nadeem enacts the story of Iqbal Hussain, a real life celebrity artist from Shahi Mohalla who proudly proclaims his controversial origins, choosing to portray the humane over the ugly. The same unapologetic streak runs throughout the novel. The main character is an exception to the rule, which declares the Shanwaz Nadeems of the world ineligible for greatness. In this reality, sons are a burden, left to wander the streets with pipedreams; daughters, however, are valued and brought up to inherit the ‘family business’.

Since the children from the red light district are easily picked out through their accents, the fate of its 10-year-old male protagonist appears sealed. Partition is on the horizon as the boy without a future is introduced as a “useless pawn on the chessboard of a marginal society”. As the offspring of a ‘dancer’, his coming of age runs parallel with a young nation. He will take on the role of an artist wielding art as a tool to extricate himself from his circumstances — and to claim a place in society for not just himself but also his ‘subjects’.

Readers must brace themselves for the depravity that goes with ‘Hira Mandi’ and the surprisingly devastating criticism that emanates from its icy foundations. The characters caught in Hira Mandi’s vice-like grip are framed against the fresh hopes of a fledgling nation set to embark on its maiden voyage. The novel is prompted by Shanwaz’s cynicism and disillusionment to confront the crooked dimensions of these parallel universes. Searing commentary mercilessly rips through the beautiful fa├žade, leaving the memory of its most revered icons in shreds.

As a boy he listens to Pran Chowdhry — the friendly neighbourhood Hindu depicted as an ardent admirer of Gandhi, whose bias for the man responsible for partition cannot be concealed; Sikhs and Hindus are presented as the recipients of violence before they begin doling out their own brand of terror. In Pran’s eyes, Jinnah will appear as a “severe, unbending messiah” who terrorises his kind and walks with “a condescending smile on his bony face”. His sentiments are mirrored by an older Shanwaz who ruthlessly compares the hopes of pre-partition with the follies of the coming age in the same mocking tone that mournfully concludes that his “country never stopped paying for the savagery of its creation”.

The novel does not allow its tragic victims to stray very far. The ‘dancers’ become his muse, ‘Hira Mandi’ remains his stage, and fame beckons Shanwaz, however reluctantly. With these changes come some telling observations about “stiff, snobbish, self-centred society” now ready to fawn all over his work, the never ending political pantomimes and the ultimate fall of a nation to the “lowest degree of cultural destitution”. Some of the more traditional elements of this world will be swept away by the seismic shifts in its political/religious/social structure. He will be left to bemoan the original face of the district, then home to the rich and depraved and now frequented by the holier-than-thou, depraved politicians “who brandish the Book by day and lavish banknotes at night”. This ominous worldview succinctly defines the frustrations of his times and pauses to blame the British for the decline of the “great courtesan”. Here the past will be mercilessly dissected; the present viciously discarded, and a lost era quietly mourned from their lonely perch.

Shanwaz’s assessment of ‘Hira Mandi’, once home to royal courtesans, is kinder. He glides by aging dancers “entering the ghetto of other retired magicians, a desolate world of regrets and bitterness” prefacing their tragic lives with a befitting eulogy. Sometimes, a single beam of light can be enough to cut through centuries of murkiness and the boy who becomes the consciousness of a floundering nation carries the argument in favour of his ‘people’.

In a way Claudine Le Tourneur d’Ison is on the same quest as the protagonist — to give the death of these hopes and dreams a decent burial and jolt society out of its usual apathy. Hira Mandi’s greatest strength perhaps is the way it uses Pakistan’s moody political climate as an accomplice to provide a wider understanding of the history behind such places. Neither world can ever align and yet here they are — displayed side by side, the shifting sands of a modern republic and the medieval echoes of a stagnant soul.

Available at Liberty Books

Images Courtesy of: http://www.albin-michel.fr/multimedia/Article/Image/2006/9782226168214-j.jpg